First-of-Its-Kind Online Master’s Draws Wave of Applicants

First-of-Its-Kind Online Master’s Draws Wave of Applicants

In the past three weeks, Georgia Tech received nearly twice as many applications for a new low-cost online master’s program as its comparable residential program receives in a year. The degree — which uses Massive Open Online Course technology — is the first of its kind, and its popularity suggests a growing demand for online learning. The Georgia Tech program is the first master’s degree from a top-ranked university based on the technology that drives MOOCs. The only difference is it is not “open,” or free, as a MOOC is traditionally defined. Students have applied from 50 states and 80 foreign countries, according to the school. To graduate, they will never have to step foot on campus and will pay about $6,600, compared with about $44,000 for residential students.

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The Internet we each see every day is an infinitesimally tiny sliver of the whole—the parts we have curated for ourselves, the parts our network of friends and family sends to us, and the sites that we have made parts of our routines. But beyond this micro-level editing, there are also macro forces at work: The Internet largely exists for and is created by the people who are on it. This map gives a rough idea of who those people are—or, at least, where they are.

How To Opt Out Of Google’s Weird New Ads That Use Your Face And Name

How To Opt Out Of Google’s Weird New Ads That Use Your Face And Name

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